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White Sox lose Terry Doyle in the Rule 5 Draft and you should not care

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The Minnesota Twins selected RHP Terry Doyle from the White Sox in this morning's Rule 5 Draft. While people like to talk about Johan Santana or Joakim Soria as examples of how "hidden gems" can be found in the draft, that was under the old rules. Starting with the 2007 draft, teams were given another year of team control over players before they are eligible to be selected.

Adam Foster at Project Prospect further quantifies why you shouldn't care:

  • Not a single No. 1 overall Rule 5 Draft pick has provided the team that selected him above-replacement-level MLB value in more than a decade.
  • The average Rule 5 Draft pick since 2007 has yielded the following career WAR value: Median: 0.0 WAR. Mode: 0.0 WAR. Mean: 0.2 WAR.

  • Nealy half of the players selected in the Rule 5 Draft since 2007 have spent 0 days in the big leagues.
  • Over a third of the players selected have yielded below-replacement-level career WAR values.
  • The cumulative WAR value of every player selected since 2007 is 14.0.

For those who still care after that, you can read the scouting report I wrote about Doyle last month. He throws strikes and can pitch a lot of innings. Sounds like the prototypical Twins pitcher. And if that wasn't good enough to make the 40 man roster of the White Sox, that should tell you a whole lot. Doyle will now get a shot with an organization that may actually consider him to be a possible major league pitcher. If he doesn't stick on their major league roster, he may come back to the White Sox.

As usual, the White Sox passed in each of the major league, the Triple A and the Double A portions of the draft. But they did gain the $50,000 for having a player selected.

In minorly interesting news, Aaron Poreda, the White Sox first round pick in 2007, was selected by the Pirates the Triple A portion. Poreda, as you can probably gather from him not even being included on the Padres' minor league protected list, has completely fallen apart since he was traded to the Padres as the key part of the Jake Peavy trade.