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Vote for the 2022 South Side Sox White Sox Hall of Fame!

Our fifth annual vote to immortalize the best South Siders of all time.

Detroit Tigers v Chicago White Sox
It seems we will have one no-brainer in our 2022 Hall class.
Nuccio DiNuzzo/Getty Images

Once upon a time, the Chicago White Sox had a team Hall of Fame — until they decided to put it in mothballs, in favor of an extended gift shop. Now the Sox have a two-story team store, and they have yet to bring the team Hall of Fame back.

We were tired of waiting, so we established a virtual one.

As you just experienced with our 2022 Cooperstown Hall of Fame vote, you are no longer restricted to voting for just 10 players. There is no limit. And like in our Cooperstown vote last month, the voting is here on site, rather than forcing you into a Google poll offsite, so you can see the progress of the vote in real time.

Because no one received zero votes in 2021, we remove the player(s) who finishes last in voting. That means José Quintana, Matt Thornton and Terry Forster have fallen off of the ballot, eligible again in 2027.

And, best of all, this year bonus categories are back! As with the player votes, you’ll be able to see the progress of all the bonus category votes in real time, as well. Unlike the player vote, however, the candidate with the most votes in a bonus category is enshrined — no need to hit a 75% minimum.

In 2018, with our inaugural White Sox Hall vote, we enshrined five players: Frank Thomas, Minnie Miñoso, Luis Aparicio, Nellie Fox and Luke Appling. Players need 75% of votes to gain induction, so near-misses included Mark Buehrle (66.7%), Joe Jackson (63.3%), and Paul Konerko (61.4%).

The second year of voting in 2019 landed Buehrle (82.5%), Billy Pierce (75.8%) and Eddie Collins (75.4%) into the Hall, with Ed Walsh’s 68.3% getting him closer to entry.

In 2020 at South Side Hit Pen, it was a five-member class inducted into the White Sox Hall of Fame: Joe Jackson (81%), Carlton Fisk (79%), Paul Konerko (79%), Harold Baines (78%) and Ed Walsh (75%).

And in 2021 back here at SSS, just one candidate, Ted Lyons, snuck in (75%). Robin Ventura fell a handful of votes short (73.5%), and Wilbur Wood in in the running (68.4%).

In 2018, we also enshrined 2005 (Team), Bill Veeck (Contributor), Exploding Scoreboard (Gimmick), Disco Demolition (Promotion), 1991 (Uniform), Ozzie Guillén (Manager), and 2005 World Series Sweep (Moment).

In 2019, the extra categories winners included 1917 (Team), Nancy Faust (Contributor), Na Na Hey Hey (Kiss Him Goodbye) (Gimmick/Promotion), four straight ALCS complete games (2005 Moment), Mark Buehrle between-the-legs (Defensive Play), Dick Allen (Meteoric Player), Ozzie Guillén (Character) and Jim Margalus (South Side Sox member).

In 2020, the extra category winners were 1906 (Team), Al Lopez (Manager), Seventh-Inning Stretch (Gimmick/Promotion), Hitless Wonders Upset (Moment), 11-1 Record (2005 Moment), Dewayne Wise “The Catch” (Defensive Play), Albert Belle (Meteoric Player), and Tom Paciorek (Character).

You have until February 13 to vote, as the 2022 White Sox Hall of Fame class will be announced on Valentine’s Day.

Note: aWAR averages Baseball-Reference (bWAR) and FanGraphs (fWAR) WAR measures, when available. aaWAR adjusts aWAR to account for lost time due to work stoppage, military service, or institutional racism. Each WAR measure listed is for White Sox play only.


José Abreu
First Baseman
(2014-present)
bWAR 27.7
fWAR 23.2
aWAR: 25.5
aaWAR: 30.6
Last year’s SSS vote First year on ballot
Core Stats 228 HR, 788 RBI, .290/.350/.515, 135 OPS+, 2020 MVP, three-time All-Star, 2014 Rookie of the Year, two Top 5 MVP finishes

Everyone knows José Abreu, and what a key cog he has been for the White Sox, both in rebuilding and contention times. In a tight battle with Chris Sale and Tim Anderson, Abreu is probably the club’s “player of the 2010s.” He has been the unofficial captain of the club almost upon arrival in Chicago, and continues to play mentor and father figure to not only White Sox Latin players, but every player. He is already 14th all-time in White Sox player WAR, and could crack the Top 10 by year’s end with a full, All-Star caliber season.

Poll

Should José Abreu be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 78%
    Yes
    (132 votes)
  • 21%
    No
    (36 votes)
168 votes total Vote Now

Eddie Cicotte
Right-Handed Starting Pitcher
(1912-20)
bWAR 28.4
fWAR 38.6
aWAR 33.5
aaWAR 34.5
Last year’s SSS vote 46% (+9%)
Core Stats 156-101, 183 CG, 28 SHO, 21 SV, 2.25 ERA/2.48 FIP, 1.11 WHIP, 133 ERA+, 1917 World Series, 1919 AL Pennant

Joe Jackson wasn’t the only future Hall-of-Famer who lost his shot at immortality after joining the Black Sox, as Eddie Cicotte was well on his way to Cooperstown when he was banned in 1920. He immediately shifted from solid starter to star in his first full season with the White Sox (1913), and was the ace of the 1917 World Series winners (leading the league with 28 wins, a 1.53 ERA and 346 ⅔ innings). The knuckleballer’s last season as the best in baseball was the ill-fated 1919 season, when he went 29-7 with a 1.82 ERA in 306 ⅔ innings; that postseason, he went 1-2 with two complete games and a 2.91 ERA. With his conscience eating at him, Cicotte admitted to his role in the fix in 1920 and was banned for life.

Poll

Should Eddie Cicotte be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 55%
    Yes
    (83 votes)
  • 44%
    No
    (67 votes)
150 votes total Vote Now

George Davis
Shortstop
(1902, 1904-09)
bWAR 33.1
fWAR 32.0
aWAR 32.6
Last year’s SSS vote 6% (-1%)
Core Stats .259/.333/.332, 6 HR, 377 RBI, 162 SB, 109 OPS+, 1906 World Series, Hall of Fame

Future Hall-of-Famer George Davis jumped to the White Sox just as the franchise was establishing itself as the preeminent power in the new American League, busy gobbling up National League talent. He was so respected he’d even managed his former team, the New York Giants. Both leagues squabbled over the rights to Davis, but Chicago eventually won out — in time to see Davis pace the Hitless Wonders to an upset win over the crosstown Cubs in the 1906 World Series. While 1906 was Davis’ last great season, the shortstop still ranks ninth all-time in White Sox position player WAR.

Poll

Should George Davis be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 43%
    Yes
    (57 votes)
  • 56%
    No
    (75 votes)
132 votes total Vote Now

Ray Durham
Second Baseman
(1995-2002)
bWAR 21.4
fWAR 13.7
aWAR 17.6
aaWAR 18.9
Last year’s SSS vote 25% (+19%)
Core Stats .278/.352/.428, 1,246 H, 106 HR, 484 RBI, 219 SB, 102 OPS+, two-time All-Star

Ray Durham was a steady influence on some perennially-disappointing 1990s White Sox teams, finally breaking through in the postseason in 2000, when he put up a .985 OPS as one of the few South Side hitters who didn’t wilt vs. the Mariners. He finished sixth in Rookie of the Year voting in 1995 despite putting up a statistically disappointing season, but would go on to make All-Star teams in 1998 and 2000. Durham’s 5.5 offensive WAR in 1998 ranked ninth in the AL, and he led the league in double plays in both 1998 and 2000. Durham’s closest player comps during his White Sox years were Bobby Grich and Joe Morgan, and a second baseman can’t find better company than that. Apparently Willie Harris and D’Angelo Jiménez waiting in the wings prompted the White Sox to dump Durham and some cash on the Oakland A’s at the trade deadline in 2002 for Jon Adkins. He’d go on to be a very productive player for four more seasons, so that’s a trade fail for Ken Williams.

Poll

Should Ray Durham be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 38%
    Yes
    (56 votes)
  • 61%
    No
    (89 votes)
145 votes total Vote Now

Red Faber
Right-Handed Starting Pitcher
(1914-33)
bWAR 64
fWAR 52.2
aWAR: 58.1
aaWAR: 58.4
Last year’s SSS vote 53% (+11%)
Core Stats 254-213, 273 CG, 29 SHO, 27 SV, 3.15 ERA/3.43 FIP, 1.30 WHIP, 119 ERA+, two ERA titles, 1917 World Series, 1919 AL Pennant, Hall of Fame

Urban “Red” Faber isn’t just a Hall-of-Famer who spent his entire 20-year career with the White Sox — he is one of the great what-ifs in White Sox history. Faber had delivered one World Series win to the White Sox, in 1917. Two years later, he fell ill during his military service in World War I and could not recover in time to be a factor in that fall’s World Series; Faber as the ace vs. the Cincinnati Reds could well have redirected history and wiped the Black Sox out of the record books. After the Black Sox purge, he remained a mainstay on the South Side, pitching a dozen more years and making his way into Cooperstown.

Poll

Should Red Faber be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 84%
    Yes
    (124 votes)
  • 15%
    No
    (23 votes)
147 votes total Vote Now

Joe Horlen
Right-Handed Starting Pitcher
(1961-71)
bWAR 23.0
fWAR 25.3
aWAR: 24.2
Last year’s SSS vote 20% (+11%)
Core Stats 113-113, 59 CG, 18 SHO, 3.11 ERA/3.35 FIP, 1.19 WHIP, 110 ERA+, one-time All-Star, one ERA title, Top 5 MVP finish, one Top 5 Cy Young finish

You can call him Joe, or you can call him Joel, but you doesn’t have to call him Johnson. An All-America Second Teamer out of Oklahoma State, Horlen was signed by the White Sox in their magical year of 1959. The native Texan would hit the majors two years later, and pitch on the South Side for a decade. By 1964, he would enter the White Sox’s starting rotation for good, finishing the year second AL ERA (1.88) and whiffs (138), led in WHIP (0.935), and was the best in the majors in H/9, with 6.07. He was murder on the AL after that, regularly posting amazing ERAs. By 1967, Horlen went 19-7 and led the AL in ERA (2.06), shutouts (six) and WHIP (.953), and made the All-Star team for his first and only time. On September 10, in the heat of a furious pennant race, Horlen no-hit the Detroit Tigers at Comiskey Park. (It would be 40 years before another White Sox pitcher, Mark Buehrle, would throw a no-hitter in Chicago.) Horlen finished second in Cy Young and fourth in MVP voting in 1967. After that, as the White Sox stumbled toward the 1970s, Horlen’s performances diminished, but the ultimate insult came in 1972, when Horlen (the team’s union rep) was waived after leading a unanimous vote to strike. Horlen caught on with the Oakland A’s, and relieved for them on their way to a first World Series title — making him the only player in history to win a Pony League World Series (1952), College World Series (1959) and MLB World Series (1972) ring.

Poll

Should Joe Horlen be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 32%
    Yes
    (40 votes)
  • 67%
    No
    (84 votes)
124 votes total Vote Now

Tommy John
Left-Handed Starting Pitcher
(1965-71)
bWAR 24.3
fWAR 25.1
aWAR: 24.7
Last year’s SSS vote 39% (+27%)
Core Stats 82-80, 56 CG, 21 SHO, 2.95 ERA/3.20 FIP, 1.22 WHIP, 117 ERA+, one-time All-Star

It’s uncanny how similar the White Sox careers of Tommy John and Horlen are, down to career WAR totals. In one snapshot of how underrated those 1960s White Sox teams were, John was essentially the same pitcher in Chicago in the 1960s as he was with the Dodgers in the 1970s — yet he was a mere one-time All-Star with the White Sox, a multiple All-Star, Cy Young finalist and MVP candidate in L.A. And, of course, there was one huge difference between White Sox John and Dodgers John: A reconstructed ulnar collateral ligament, the success of which attached John’s named to the now-common Tommy John surgery, and extended the southpaw’s career by 14 seasons. His astronomical career WAR makes his lack of serious consideration for Cooperstown one of the bigger injustices in Hall annals. Simply put, John was phenomenal with the White Sox, leading the majors in shutouts for both the 1966 (five) and 1967 (six) seasons. More inadvertently, John’s trade to L.A. in 1971 reaped one of the most meteoric superstars in White Sox history: Dick Allen.

Poll

Should Tommy John be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 56%
    Yes
    (79 votes)
  • 43%
    No
    (60 votes)
139 votes total Vote Now

Lance Johnson
Center Fielder
(1988-95)
bWAR 21.3
fWAR 19.4
aWAR 20.4
aaWAR 21.6
Last year’s SSS vote 4% (first year on the ballot)
Core Stats .286/.325/.373, 1,018 hits, 77 3B, 17 HR, 327 RBI, 226 SB, 92 OPS+

One-Dog was an underrated minor star for the White Sox. Although fans lament the trade of Bobby Bonilla back to the Pittsburgh Pirates for José DeLeon, DeLeon ultimately yielded Johnson, who finished his career with a higher WAR than Bonilla. In his one postseason on the South Side (1993), Johnson produced 0.23 WPA and uncharacteristic muscle: a double, triple and homer in the six games, giving him a .758 OPS for the series. Johnson also provided significant defensive value (think Adam Engel-plus) in center field while often flanked by corner outfielders who desperately benefitted from his prodigious range.

Poll

Should Lance Johnson be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 30%
    Yes
    (42 votes)
  • 69%
    No
    (96 votes)
138 votes total Vote Now

Fielder Jones
Center Fielder
(1901-08)
bWAR 32.0
fWAR 32.4
aWAR 32.2
Last year’s SSS vote 14% (+2%)
Core Stats .269/.357/.326, 1,151 hits, 10 HR, 375 RBI, 206 SB, 112 OPS+, 1906 World Series as player-manager

Like George Davis, Fielder Jones jumped to the White Sox once the American League presented itself as an alternative/equal to the National League, joining the White Sox in 1901 and spending most of the decade on the South Side. Also like Davis, Jones had second thoughts (or wanted to manipulate the system further) and jump back to the NL, but White Sox owner kept Jones on the club by making him White Sox manager. He would lead the Hitless Wonders to World Series victory over the Cubs in 1906. A star center fielder and acclaimed manager, Jones deigned to add “owner” to his resume — but Charles Comiskey would not grant Jones an ownership stake. Comiskey offered Jones a blank check to stay on as manager; Jones refused.

Poll

Should Fielder Jones be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 38%
    Yes
    (46 votes)
  • 61%
    No
    (73 votes)
119 votes total Vote Now

Chet Lemon
Center Fielder
(1975-81)
bWAR 24.9
fWAR 22.7
aWAR 23.8
aaWAR 25.8
Last year’s SSS vote 43% (+32%)
Core Stats .288/.363/.451, 73 HR, 348 RBI, 804 hits, 126 OPS+, two-time All-Star

Arguably the best fielding center fielder in White Sox history, Chet Lemon came to the White Sox in 1975 from the Oakland Athletics in exchange for pitcher Stan Bahnsen. Lemon, who had played the infield (poorly) with the A’s throughout his minor league career, was quickly moved to center field by White Sox manager Chuck Tanner. In his second full year in the majors (1977), Lemon hit .273 with 38 doubles and 19 homers for the South Side Hit Men. He also set major league records for chances (524) and putouts (512) in center field that have yet to be broken. In 1978, Lemon would become an All-Star for the first time, hitting .300, and followed that in 1979 with his best year on the South Side, slashing .318/.391/.496 and adding a league-leading 44 doubles in a 5.8 bWAR season. With Carlton Fisk pre-empting him as the Chisox’s top-salaried player, Lemon planned to become a free agent after 1982. Rather than lose Lemon for no return, new owners Jerry Reinsdorf and Eddie Einhorn shipped him to the Detroit Tigers for Steve Kemp, breaking this writer’s heart into a million billion pieces.

Poll

Should Chet Lemon be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 52%
    Yes
    (68 votes)
  • 47%
    No
    (62 votes)
130 votes total Vote Now

Sherm Lollar
Catcher
(1952-63)
bWAR 25.6
fWAR 32.2
aWAR 28.9
Last year’s SSS vote 35% (+14%)
Core Stats .265/.358/.402, 124 HR, 631 RBI, 1,122 hits, 106 OPS+, eight-time All-Star, three Gold Gloves

Sherm Lollar was the backstop mainstay for most of the amazing run of winning seasons the White Sox pulled off, from 1951-67. “The Tank” was a six-time All-Star catcher with the White Sox, after stops with Cleveland, the New York Yankees and St. Louis Browns before arriving in Chicago. Lollar was a defensive ace, but added offense to the mix beginning in in 1956, when he hit .293/.383/.438, with 11 homers and 75 RBIs. Becoming a power threat, Lollar finished ninth in MVP voting in both 1958 and 1959. Lollar hit only .226 in the 1959 World Series, but his one home run tied Game 4 at four in the seventh inning. The White Sox released him in 1963, which ended his playing career.

Poll

Should Sherm Lollar be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 55%
    Yes
    (70 votes)
  • 44%
    No
    (56 votes)
126 votes total Vote Now

Jack McDowell
Right-Handed Starting Pitcher
(1987-94)
bWAR 21.6
fWAR 28.6
aWAR 25.1
aaWAR 27.0
Last year’s SSS vote 41% (+20%)
Core Stats 91-59, 49 CG, 10 SHO, 3.50 ERA/3.55 FIP, 1.25 WHIP, 117 ERA+, three-time All-Star, two Top 5 Cy Young finishes, 1993 Cy Young

Jack McDowell was the unquestioned badass of the 1990s White Sox renaissance; on a team featuring future Hall-of-Famers Carlton Fisk and Frank Thomas, no one bulldogged it better than Black Jack. He was an All-Star and Top 10 Cy Young finisher for three straight seasons (1991-93), receiving MVP votes in 1992 and 1993. He won the Cy Young in 1993. The lockout that ended the 1994 season rather tragically for White Sox fans also started the decline of McDowell’s career — although a heavy workload (his fewest innings pitched from 1991-93 was 253 ⅔) likely contributed plenty, as well. McDowell was traded to the Yankees in 1995 and had one strong season in the Bronx, but is best known for flipping off the Yankee Stadium boo birds in 1996; a longtime musician (V.I.E.W, Stickfigure), McDowell’s fellow musicians/friends in The Baseball Project wrote a song (“Yankee Flipper”) in homage to his act of heroism. In retirement, McDowell has proven both an adept broadcaster and successful coach.

Poll

Should Jack McDowell be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 69%
    Yes
    (104 votes)
  • 30%
    No
    (46 votes)
150 votes total Vote Now

Johnny Mostil
Center Fielder
(1918-29)
bWAR 24.2
fWAR 22.9
aWAR 23.6
Last year’s SSS vote 8% (+5%)
Core Stats .301/.386/.427, 82 3B, 375 RBI, 1,054 hits, 176 SB, 113 OPS+, one Top 5 MVP finish

Johnny Mostil is on the short list of most unheralded players in White Sox history, as well as the most tragic. As well outlined by a terrific SSS piece from the past, Mostil snuck into Comiskey Park to see games as a child, grew up to become a rare White Sox superstar in the shadow of the Black Sox. He peaked around age 30, leading the league in steals in 1925 and 1926, and finishing seventh and second in the AL MVP voting in those two seasons. But 1926, and his amazing 133 OPS+ season, would be Mostil’s last effective one. It wasn’t a rapid decline in skills, but a brutal suicide attempt in 1927 that derailed Mostil’s career; he did come back, playing a full, but far less effective 1928 season. But before his 33rd birthday, Mostil’s career was over. There is a happy enough ending to Mostil’s story; after his playing career, he scouted for the White Sox and managed in the minor leagues, living to age 74.

Poll

Should Johnny Mostil be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 30%
    Yes
    (34 votes)
  • 69%
    No
    (79 votes)
113 votes total Vote Now

Magglio Ordóñez
Right Fielder
(1997-2004)
bWAR 25.3
fWAR 22.6
aWAR 24.0
Last year’s SSS vote 51% (+31%)
Core Stats .307/.364/.525, 187 HR, 703 RBI, 1,167 hits, 127 OPS+, four-time All-Star, Top 5 Rookie of the Year finish

Magglio Ordoñez’s ugly departure from the White Sox, to division rival Detroit, somewhat overshadows his status as one of the best outfielders in team history. He broke in the bigs at age 23 in 1997, and never ceded right field after that. Playing in the shadow of slugger Frank Thomas in the lineup, Ordoñez nonetheless became the centerpiece of a “new look” White Sox, exemplified by The Kids Can Play campaign that spurred a surprise 2000 division title. All the now-superstar did that season was put up a .315 average, with 32 homers and 126 knocked in. Magglio’s biggest year came in 2002, slashing .320/.381/.597 with 47 doubles, 38 homers and 135 RBIs. In 2004, Ordóñez’s season came to an end after 52 games when he suffered a serious knee injury — and his decision to pursue alternate rehab treatments, not approved by the White Sox, spurred his departure from the South Side.

Poll

Should Magglio Ordoñez be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 61%
    Yes
    (94 votes)
  • 38%
    No
    (59 votes)
153 votes total Vote Now

Gary Peters
Left-Handed Starting Pitcher
(1959-69)
bWAR 25.9
fWAR 30.9
aWAR 28.4
Last year’s SSS vote 30% (+12%)
Core Stats 91-78, 60 CG, 18 SHO, 1,098 K, 2.72 ERA/3.04 FIP, 1.190 WHIP, 115 ERA+, two ERA titles, 1963 Rookie of the Year, two-time All-Star

Gary Peters made his hay on the mid-1960s White Sox juggernauts, but his history with the team extended back to the Go-Go 1959 club, for which he made his major league debut with one inning pitched in two games. Continuing to struggle to break onto Chicago’s loaded roster over the next three seasons, Peters was still a rookie in his fifth MLB campaign (1963), when he broke through to go 19-8 with a league-leading 2.33 ERA, 2.34 FIP and 150 ERA+, winning the Rookie of the Year. He also finished eighth in MVP voting in 1963, seventh in 1964, and ninth in 1967, while strangely never garnering Cy Young consideration. Peters was a two-time All-Star, twice leading the AL in ERA and ERA+.

Poll

Should Gary Peters be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 51%
    Yes
    (62 votes)
  • 48%
    No
    (59 votes)
121 votes total Vote Now

Alexei Ramírez
Shortstop
(2008-15)
bWAR 23.1
fWAR 19.6
aWAR 21.4
Last year’s SSS vote 18% (+13%)
Core Stats .270/.310/.399, 1,272 H, 109 HR, 590 RBI, 143 SB, 89 OPS+, Top 5 Rookie of the Year finish, one-time All-Star

The first bonus baby of the White Sox’s 21st Century run on Cuban stars, Alexei Ramírez made an instant impact on the White Sox, debuting in center field before settling in at second base for a runner-up Rookie of the Year campaign in 2008. Moving to shortstop and improving each year, Ramírez won Silver Sluggers in 2010 and 2014, was the Wilson Defensive SS of the Year in 2012 and was an All-Star in 2014. His penchant for dramatic hits — and dramatic reactions to getting hit on the field — remain legendary.

Poll

Should Alexei Ramírez be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 38%
    Yes
    (56 votes)
  • 61%
    No
    (88 votes)
144 votes total Vote Now

Chris Sale
Left-Handed Pitcher
(2010-16)
bWAR 30.0
fWAR 27.1
aWAR 28.6
Last year’s SSS vote 39% (up 21%)
Core Stats 74-50, 15 CG, 12 SV, 1,244 K, 3.00 ERA/3.06 FIP, 1.07 WHIP, 135 ERA+, five-time All-Star, four Top 5 Cy Young finishes

Chris Sale was drafted by the White Sox in 2010, and after throwing 10 ⅓ minor league innings found himself in Chicago later that season. Sale pitched impressively out of the bullpen in his first two campaigns before making the jump to the rotation in 2012. Sale started a streak of All-Star appearances that year that is still continuing. He went 17-8 with a 3.05 ERA in 2012, and in 2013 went 11-14 with a 3.07 ERA on a terrible club. In 2014, Sale was 12-4 with a 2.17 ERA. In 2015, Sale led the league in strikeouts (setting a White Sox record with 274), as he went 13-11. Chris was 17-10 with a 3.34 ERA in 2016, his final season with the White Sox. Sale finished in the top six in Cy Young voting every season he pitched as a starter. The White Sox however, never made the playoffs with Sale, and they traded him to Boston in 2017. Sale is sixth in White Sox history with 1,244 strikeouts, and his combined career in Chicago and Boston places him as the all-time MLB leader in K/9 (10.9) and K/SO (5.31).

Poll

Should Chris Sale be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 64%
    Yes
    (98 votes)
  • 35%
    No
    (53 votes)
151 votes total Vote Now

Ray Schalk
Catcher
(1912-28)
bWAR 33.2
fWAR 22.4
aWAR 27.8
aaWAR 28.2
Last year’s SSS vote 39% (+15%)
Core Stats .254/.340/.316, 1,345 hits, 11 HR, 593 RBI, 177 SB, 83 OPS+, one Top 5 MVP finish, 1917 World Series, Hall of Fame

Ray Schalk was a White Sox mainstay, with a long tenure both before and after the Black Sox scandal at the end of the 1910s. His MLB debut came in 1912 at age 19, and from there Schalk would catch four of every five White Sox games until 1926. Lost in the Schalk’s tepid offensive numbers is the fact that he caught some extraordinary White Sox pitchers and helped shepherd them to greatness, among them Ed Walsh, Ted Lyons, Red Faber and Eddie Cicotte. Schalk was another White Sox player so esteemed that he was given the reins to the team as manager (in 1927) as his playing career was winding down.

(For more information on Schalk, refer back to katiesphil’s terrific piece from 2018.)

Poll

Should Ray Schalk be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 68%
    Yes
    (82 votes)
  • 31%
    No
    (37 votes)
119 votes total Vote Now

Robin Ventura
Third Baseman
(1989-98)
bWAR 39.4
fWAR 39.2
aWAR 39.3
aaWAR 41.1
Last year’s SSS vote 74% (+23%)
Core Stats .274/.365/.440, 171 HR, 741 RBI, 1,244 hits, 117 OPS+, five Gold Gloves, one-time All-Star

Don’t let Robin Ventura’s lukewarm managerial career for the White Sox sour you on his greatness as a player — in fact, his career is worthy of Cooperstown. After a gilded college career at Oklahoma State (where his record hitting streak was snapped by future teammate and SSS White Sox Hall of Fame ballot mate Jack McDowell), Ventura encountered adversity in 1990, enduring long hitless streaks. But he blossomed as a hitter and in the field as the White Sox moved across the streak to a new ballpark, and for most of the 1990s he was the best two-way third baseman in the majors. He suffered a grotesque ankle injury during spring training in 1997, fought back to miraculously play later in the season, only to see management bail on the club with the White Flag trade. That perceived disloyalty helped trigger his move to the New York Mets after the 1998 season.

Poll

Should Robin Ventura be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 78%
    Yes
    (116 votes)
  • 21%
    No
    (31 votes)
147 votes total Vote Now

Doc White
Left-Handed Starting Pitcher
(1903-13)
bWAR 37.9
fWAR 25.3
aWAR 31.6
Last year’s SSS vote 11% (up 4%)
Core Stats 159-123, 206 CG, 42 SHO, 2.30 ERA/2.49 FIP, 1.11 WHIP, 114 ERA+, one ERA title, 1906 World Series, dentist

Doc White wasn’t just a whiz around a dentist’s chair, he was pretty good tooling around the pitching mound as well. Another jumper from National to American during the early 1900s war for players, and once he jumped to the South Side White spend the next 11 seasons as a star behind ace Ed Walsh. In 1904, just his second year with the White Sox, White reeled off five straight shutouts, an accomplishment that wouldn’t be surpassed for 64 years. White was the AL ERA champ (1.52) during the World Series-winning season of 1906, when a flaccid White Sox offense put enormous pressure on the rotation.

Poll

Should Doc White be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 46%
    Yes
    (52 votes)
  • 53%
    No
    (61 votes)
113 votes total Vote Now

Hoyt Wilhelm
Right-Handed Relief Pitcher
(1963-68)
bWAR 16.0
fWAR 9.9
aWAR 13.0
Last year’s SSS vote 60% (+26%)
Core Stats 41-33, 99 SV, 1.92 ERA/2.51 FIP, 0.94 WHIP, 171 ERA+, Hall of Fame

There is no other player in baseball history quite like Hoyt Wilhelm, who joined the White Sox at age 40 — then pitched in Chicago till age 45, the longest stretch he’d pitch with any team, and his best run in the majors. In his first season (1963), Wilhelm had 21 saves and a 2.64 ERA, and in his next five seasons his ERA never tripped above 2.00 (it was 1.99, 1.81, 1.66, 1.31 and 1.73). The White Sox didn’t “get rid” of Wilhelm, even at age 46 — the Kansas City Royals snagged the ace in the 1968 expansion draft. To this day, there’s never been a more impressive run of relief pitching in team history.

Poll

Should Hoyt Wilhelm be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 79%
    Yes
    (104 votes)
  • 20%
    No
    (27 votes)
131 votes total Vote Now

Wilbur Wood
Left-Handed Pitcher
(1967-78)
bWAR 50.0
fWAR 34.5
aWAR 42.3
aaWAR 42.7
Last year’s SSS vote 68% (+12%)
Core Stats 163-148, 113 CG, 24 SHO, 57 SV, 3.18 ERA/3.33 FIP, 1.23 WHIP, 116 ERA+, three-time All-Star, two Top 5 Cy Young finishes

Hoyt Wilhelm had one more trick up his sleeve before he left the White Sox: He taught his dancing knuckleball to Wilbur Wood, who went on to throw possibly the best lefty knuckleball ever. In his first year with the knuckler, Wood threw 95 ⅓ innings with a 2.45 ERA. He followed that up in 1968 with an impressive 1.87 ERA over 159 innings, and a league-leading 88 games. In 1969, Wood went 10-11 with a 3.01 ERA over 76 games, and in 1970 led the league in appearances for the third year in a row, compiling a 2.81 ERA with 21 saves over 121 ⅔ innings. Manager Chuck Tanner looked over his bereft roster at that point and decided the only prescription for a sorry staff was MORE WILBUR. In the rotation, Wood did his best impression of Ed Walsh and became an enormous (and effective) workhorse. In 1971, Wood started 42 games, winning and completing 22 of them, with a ridiculous 1.81 ERA over 334 innings. In 1972, Wood started 49 games, threw 376 23 innings and won 24 games, all three figures leading the league. He had a 2.51 ERA that year. He led the league in starts (48), innings (359 13) and wins (24) in 1973. He was 20-19 in 1974, and was an All-Star for the third time. He lost 20 games in 1975, with a 4.11 ERA over 291 13 innings. He pitched three more years for the White Sox, with a broken kneecap from a line drive in 1976 effectively ended his career.

Poll

Should Wilbur Wood be elected to our White Sox Hall of Fame on this ballot?

This poll is closed

  • 93%
    Yes
    (126 votes)
  • 6%
    No
    (9 votes)
135 votes total Vote Now

Bonus Categories

The bonus categories are constantly evolving, and there are even four new ones introduced this year. Enjoy!

Team
Previous winners include the 2005 team (2018), the 1917 team (2019), and the 1906 team (2020).

Poll

Which team should be the next enshrined in our White Sox Hall of Fame?

This poll is closed

  • 7%
    1901 (83 wins, tied for seventh-best all-time White Sox record, won AL pennant)
    (11 votes)
  • 49%
    1959 (94 wins, tied for seventh-best all-time White Sox record, won AL pennant, lost World Series in six games)
    (72 votes)
  • 6%
    1964 (98 wins, tied for 10th-best all-time White Sox record, missed AL pennant by 1 game)
    (9 votes)
  • 22%
    1983 (99 wins, tied for fifth-best all-time White Sox record, lost ALCS three games to one)
    (32 votes)
  • 14%
    1993 (94 wins, tied for 19th-best all-time White Sox record, lost ALCS four games to two)
    (21 votes)
145 votes total Vote Now

Manager
Previous winners include Ozzie Guillén (2018) and Al Lopez (2020). mWAR is a measure of managerial effectiveness, getting the most with the players provided.

Poll

Which manager should be the next enshrined in our White Sox Hall of Fame?

This poll is closed

  • 77%
    Jimmy Dykes (899 wins, winningest and most-tenured in White Sox history, 34.4 mWAR, best manager in White Sox history based on mWAR per season)
    (94 votes)
  • 0%
    Clark Griffith (157 wins, one pennant, 2.3 mWAR, fifth-best manager in White Sox history based on mWAR per season)
    (0 votes)
  • 14%
    Fielder Jones (426 wins, .592 winning percentage, one World Series win, 6.2 mWAR, fourth-best manager in White Sox history based on mWAR per season)
    (18 votes)
  • 3%
    Bob Lemon (124 wins, 1.4 mWAR, seventh-best manager in White Sox history based on mWAR per season)
    (4 votes)
  • 4%
    Ted Lyons (185 wins, 5.1 mWAR, second-best manager in White Sox history based on mWAR per season)
    (5 votes)
121 votes total Vote Now

Gimmick/Promotion
This category started out separated, now it’s combined. Past winners include the exploding scoreboard (2018), Disco Demolition Night (2018) and the “Na Na Hey Hey” taunt (2019).

Poll

Which gimmick or promotion should be the next enshrined in our White Sox Hall of Fame?

This poll is closed

  • 32%
    The Center Field Shower (1970s)
    (45 votes)
  • 16%
    Turn Back the Clock Day (1990)
    (23 votes)
  • 13%
    Dog Day (1990s)
    (19 votes)
  • 14%
    Elvis Night (1990s)
    (20 votes)
  • 21%
    Names on Road Uniforms (1960)
    (30 votes)
137 votes total Vote Now

2005 Moment
Realizing that there are an overwhelming number of memories from the World Series season, and that nearly all of us remember the season, we made 2005 its own Hall of Fame wing. Past winners include four straight complete games (2019) and the 11-1 postseason record (2020).

Poll

Which moment from the 2005 season should be the next enshrined in our White Sox Hall of Fame?

This poll is closed

  • 24%
    Paul Konerko’s grand slam in World Series Game 2
    (35 votes)
  • 22%
    A.J. Pierzynski’s dropped third strike steal of first in ALCS Game 2
    (32 votes)
  • 22%
    El Duque’s bases-loaded escape in ALCS Game 3
    (32 votes)
  • 27%
    Scott Podsednik’s walk-off home run in World Series Game 2
    (39 votes)
  • 3%
    Joe Crede’s walk-off home run to snap the White Sox slide vs. Cleveland on September 20
    (5 votes)
143 votes total Vote Now

Defensive Play
Past winners have included Mark Buehrle’s between-the-legs assist (2019) and DeWayne Wise’s “The Catch” (2020).

Poll

Which defensive play should be the next enshrined in our White Sox Hall of Fame?

This poll is closed

  • 47%
    Juan Uribe crashes into the stands for a catch in the ninth inning of World Series Game 4 in 2005
    (68 votes)
  • 11%
    Tadahito Iguchi goes horizontal for an assist in 2006.
    (16 votes)
  • 0%
    Iván Calderon climbs onto the wall in left field at Tiger Stadium for a putout
    (1 vote)
  • 11%
    Ken Griffey Jr. nails Michael Cuddyer at the plate, A.J. Pierzynski holds onto the tag, in the Blackout Game in 2008.
    (16 votes)
  • 0%
    Center fielder Johnny Mostil catches a foul fly ball during a spring training game in the 1920s.
    (0 votes)
  • 28%
    Carlton Fisk tags out two Yankees at home plate on one play in 1985
    (41 votes)
142 votes total Vote Now

Contributor
Past winners have included Bill Veeck (2018) and Nancy Faust (2019).

Poll

Which contributor should be the next enshrined in our White Sox Hall of Fame?

This poll is closed

  • 41%
    Hawk Harrelson
    (58 votes)
  • 36%
    Minnie Miñoso
    (51 votes)
  • 5%
    Charles Comiskey
    (8 votes)
  • 12%
    Roland Hemond
    (18 votes)
  • 3%
    Jerry Reinsdorf
    (5 votes)
140 votes total Vote Now

Uniform
There are only so many uniforms to choose from, so we’ll space this one out a bit. There’s been one prior winner: the 1991 (present) uniform (in 2018).

Poll

Which uniform should be the next enshrined in our White Sox Hall of Fame?

This poll is closed

  • 31%
    1983’s horizontal stripes
    (42 votes)
  • 24%
    1959’s classic pinstripes
    (33 votes)
  • 29%
    1917’s Field of Dreams pinstripes
    (40 votes)
  • 8%
    1972’s red pinstripes and blue road zip-ups
    (11 votes)
  • 5%
    Late 1960’s powder-blue road uniforms
    (8 votes)
134 votes total Vote Now

Home Run
This is a new category, picking a single home run for immortality.

Poll

Which home run should be the first enshrined in our White Sox Hall of Fame?

This poll is closed

  • 4%
    Bo Jackson’s division-winning towering fly in 1993
    (7 votes)
  • 10%
    Jim Thome’s Blackout Game blast to CF
    (15 votes)
  • 31%
    Paul Konerko’s grand slam in Game 2 of the 2005 World Series
    (45 votes)
  • 39%
    Scott Podsednik’s walk-off in Game 2 of the 2005 World Series
    (57 votes)
  • 6%
    Harold Baines’ 25th inning walk-off to end the longest game in AL history, in 1984
    (10 votes)
  • 2%
    Al Smith’s homer in 1960 that set off the Comiskey Park scoreboard for the first time
    (3 votes)
  • 1%
    Pat Seerey’s fourth home run in a single game in 1948, making him the sixth major leaguer to accomplish the feat
    (2 votes)
  • 2%
    Luis Robert’s moon shot in the 2020 ALDS
    (4 votes)
143 votes total Vote Now

Nickname
And here’s another new one that I can’t believe we’ve never run before. There are a lot of options, at least this first time around.

Poll

Which nickname should be the first enshrined in our White Sox Hall of Fame?

This poll is closed

  • 2%
    Pudge Fisk
    (4 votes)
  • 10%
    Old Aches & Pains Appling
    (15 votes)
  • 0%
    Roadrunner Garr
    (1 vote)
  • 0%
    El Duque Hernández
    (0 votes)
  • 4%
    One Dog Johnson
    (6 votes)
  • 2%
    El Caballo Lee
    (4 votes)
  • 1%
    Blue Moon Odom
    (2 votes)
  • 2%
    The Cuban Missile Ramírez
    (3 votes)
  • 3%
    La Pantera Robert
    (5 votes)
  • 3%
    Wimpy Paciorek
    (5 votes)
  • 0%
    The Pope Pall
    (0 votes)
  • 65%
    The Big Hurt Thomas
    (91 votes)
  • 1%
    The Milkman Perry
    (2 votes)
138 votes total Vote Now

Ballpark Food
OK, concessions are not unique, per se, to Sox Park. However, there are some that were either innovated or perfected on the South Side.

Poll

Which Sox Park food should be the first enshrined in our Hall of Fame?

This poll is closed

  • 11%
    Churros
    (14 votes)
  • 4%
    Elotes
    (6 votes)
  • 43%
    Chicago dog
    (53 votes)
  • 16%
    Sausich/peppers/onions
    (20 votes)
  • 3%
    Pizza
    (4 votes)
  • 19%
    Helmet nachos
    (23 votes)
  • 0%
    Antique Taco
    (1 vote)
121 votes total Vote Now

Oddity
The White Sox have had a lot of weird stuff happen in their past. Here’s a new, catch-all category.

Poll

Which White Sox oddity should be the first enshrined in our Hall of Fame?

This poll is closed

  • 20%
    Andy the Clown
    (27 votes)
  • 15%
    Minnie Miñoso playing in his 50s
    (20 votes)
  • 37%
    1976 shorts
    (50 votes)
  • 4%
    Martians abduct Luis Aparicio and Nellie Fox in 1959
    (6 votes)
  • 3%
    Tres Garcías outfield
    (4 votes)
  • 8%
    Yolmer Sánchez’s Gatorade antics
    (11 votes)
  • 3%
    455 feet to center field at Comiskey Park
    (4 votes)
  • 7%
    Immediate retirement of Harold Baines’ No. 3, after trading him away
    (10 votes)
132 votes total Vote Now

Of course, suggestions for future categories for our Hall, or nominees for the existing categories above, are welcomed in the comments.

Happy voting, all!