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White Sox 2014 international signings review

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18 players in all

The White Sox hope to see more of their own international amateur signings in the future. Carlos Sanchez is the only one currently on the 40-man roster.
The White Sox hope to see more of their own international amateur signings in the future. Carlos Sanchez is the only one currently on the 40-man roster.
Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports

The White Sox spent $4.7 million on international amateur free agents in 2014, good enough for 5th most in baseball. That cuts across two signing periods (2013-2014 and 2014-2015).

Highlighting the class of 18 players were four players we already knew about: SS Amado Nunez ($900K, Dominican Republic), C Jhoandro Alfaro ($750K, Dominican Republic), SS Ricky Mota ($750K, Dominican Republic) and 3B Felix Mercedes ($250K, Dominican Republic).

Other six figure signings were: C Jose Colina ($450K, Venezuela), INF Jorgen Rosas ($380K, Venezuela), RHP Edinxon Arias ($350K, Venezuela), RHP Andres Sanchez ($300K, Venezuela/Cuba), RHP Yosmer Solorzano ($100K, Dominican Republic).

Baseball American noted one other signing:

One of the best players the White Sox signed last year, Venezuelan catcher Carlos Perez, cost them just $50,000 in March. The younger brother of Angels Triple-A catcher Carlos Perez (yes, they have the same name), Perez is an 18-year-old who hit .305/.356/.326 with seven strikeouts and seven walks in 104 plate appearances in the Dominican Summer League last year. Perez has a good hitting approach and a loose, fluid swing from the right side with a knack for putting the bat to the ball, mostly with gap power. He’s a good receiver for his age with an average arm.

Tidbits on the other players:

When Nunez signed, he was an average runner who scouts thought had a chance to be a bigger-bodied shortstop who could make the routine plays with an average arm and a quick exchange, but many felt he would eventually outgrow the position and slide over to second base. Since then, he has shocked the White Sox by getting faster, running plus or better times for them from home to first.

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Alfaro doesn’t have the same raw power or athleticism of his brother, but he also changed physically as much as any high-profile player last year. Alfaro was around 5-foot-9 with a heavy frame heading into 2014, but he shot up several inches and improved his conditioning, now standing around 6-foot-1, 180 pounds.

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Now 5-foot-11, 170 pounds at 17 years old, Mota wasn’t seen a lot leading up to July 2, but the White Sox were drawn to his high-energy style and defense at shortstop, where he showed them quick feet and hands, a good arm, solid-average speed and some flashiness to his game.

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Colina, 17, has a big body (6-foot-2, 210 pounds) he will have to monitor, but while he’s not as advanced behind the plate as Alfaro, the White Sox were impressed with his defense, above-average arm and on target throws.

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After topping out in the high-80s early in the year, [Arias] touched 91-92 mph with good movement from his low three-quarters arm slot.

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Rosas, 17, is 5-foot-9, 160 pounds and excited the White Sox because of his ability to hit in games from the right side of the plate, staying inside the ball to make consistent contact with a good approach and above-average speed, although power will never be a big part of his game.

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Now [Sanchez is] 6-foot-4, 200 pounds with a low-90s fastball that has touched 94, with a curveball that has its moments but it inconsistent. He has a chance to be a starter but could end up a power arm out of the bullpen.

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Solorzano is an 18-year-old who’s 6-foot-2, 180 pounds and saw his fastball improve from 85-87 mph to touching 91-92 mph before he signed.